Think balancing your blood sugar is not important? Read this!

Well it is crucial to healthy living and I will tell you why. When we don’t know how to stabilize our blood sugar, this results in wide fluctuations in the blood glucose level throughout the day. These fluctuations in turn cause the pancreas to secret insulin in erratic amounts over time. Insulin is a hormone responsible for allowing glucose to get into the cells for energy fuel. When this mechanism is disrupted, insulin will also convert excess glucose into triglycerides, a blood fat, and eventually store this fat in your adipose cells, causing weight gain.

Well it is crucial to healthy living and I will tell you why. When we don’t know how to stabilize our blood sugar, this results in wide fluctuations in the blood glucose level throughout the day. These fluctuations in turn cause the pancreas to secret insulin in erratic amounts over time. Insulin is a hormone responsible for allowing glucose to get into the cells for energy fuel. When this mechanism is disrupted, insulin will also convert excess glucose into triglycerides, a blood fat, and eventually store this fat in your adipose cells, causing weight gain.
Balancing blood sugar
When insulin surges occur over many months or years, eventually the insulin receptor sites on the cells lose their ability to respond to insulin. Once receptor sites stop responding, there is less glucose inside the cell to utilize for energy, and one of the results is fatigue, leading many to eat sugary foods or caffeine to try to get an energy boost.

Increased sugar in the diet causes more insulin to be secreted, but since the receptors no longer respond, this excess sugar is converted to and then stored as fat. This creates a vicious snowball effect of fatigue, poor energy, and weight gain. After many years of dysglycemia, eventually this disease process becomes Metabolic Syndrome, characterized by elevated LDL cholesterol and inflammation, elevated blood pressure, fatigue, and abdominal weight gain. With enough weight gain and loss of insulin receptor function, Diabetes Type II often follows.
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